Seventh Amendment

“In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.”

This amendment deals with civil cases like “I’m suing for back rent” on Judge Judy.

  1. “In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved” – Confirms that even in a case of a civil case, you still are entitled to a fair trial.
  2. “and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.” – Once the case has been resolved, it can never been held in another courtroom.

Other notes:

  • The second part of the amendment prevents you from trying to have the case re-examined in another district.
  • I refer to Judge Judy as my example of what kind of cases are seen; my point there is that the trial more ‘express’ in nature.  These are also trials where the judge acts as the jury as well as the judge.
  • Cases can be as simple as somebody suing to collect rent from a former tenant, to be as complicated as an invalid green-card marriage.
  • Since cases seen are logged into a database that’s accessible in all 50 states, 7A is a good way to make sure that if you lose in one state, you cannot ‘retry’ the case in another.